Calvin Klein Euphoria

The problem with naming your perfumes something like “Euphoria” or “Joy” is that it inevitably raises your customer’s expectations. Your customer starts thinking that maybe your perfume can bring a little much-needed happiness into their life. Your perfume, they decide, will be the light at the end of what has been a very long tunnel. And when your perfume does not make them euphoric or joyful, they feel duped. They feel deceived. And that makes them very grumpy.

Euphoria’s deliciously honeyed top notes led me to believe that there would be much to be euphoric about. However, Euphoria soon met the tragic fate of all modern mainstream fragrances: a sugar overdose. All that sugar gives the fuzzy effect of static on your TV screen, obscuring the show you were attempting to watch. I honestly cannot distinguish a single note amidst the haze of fruity sweetness.

Sephora claims that Euphoria is a pomegranate scent, and that it is “sexy and sensual”. It is neither of these things. To give credit where credit is due, Euphoria is not in any way unpleasant or offensive. At this point, however, “non-offensive” is not quite enough to make this perfume lover euphoric.

Note: I have stopped putting disclaimers at the bottom because they are kind of a pain. If anything I review has been provided to me by a company, I will explicitly say so.

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